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Wayfarer

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  1. Wayfarer

    Open Tags Could I Have This Dance?

    Much to his delight, she had no hesitation about accepting his offer to dance though she did point out he might wish to watch out for her boots stepping on his feet, which only drew a chuckle from the young man. "I've had far worse in me life than stepped on toes. I do some fisticuffs on occasion in the ring........for money, not because I be enjoyin' that sort of thing," Robert pointed out as they walked out onto the dance floor, "Granted...no one ever tried to punch me in the feet." The pair then assumed their dancing stances and joined on in with those others waltzing and while they would hardly be confused for good dancers, they did not embarrass themselves either. And even if they had, neither seemed to be the type to worry about such nonsense anyway. @Adelaide Chappel
  2. Wayfarer

    Open Tags Meanwhile at the Evergreen Ranch

    Meanwhile, a lone rider entered the ranch grounds and after taking care of his horse, headed for the bunkhouse. Despite Harris' report to his employer, Billy was back and not jailed like Greer. There had really been nothing the local law could charge him for, there was no proof of any stolen property simply a girl's word against that of two males. Greer however had made a stupid mistake, punching that girl, however annoying she might have been. That not only got him a beating in the ensuing brawl but also he was thrown into jail. Billy on the other hand was sternly directed by the sheriff to leave town and not attend that evening's dance. He was no fool and complied, heading out of there as fast as he could mount. Once inside the bunkhouse, he removed his bloodied shirt, looked at his face in the mirror - he was lucky his nose wasn't broken and by tomorrow one eye was going to show as quite the shiner. His nose had sure bled enough though plus a split lip so he proceeded to fill a washbowl with water and use a cloth to clean his battered face. Still he consoled himself that Greer had got a far worse handling.....that idiot. He also tried not to think if he was going to be in trouble with the Steelgraves. Hell, he had just been following orders. "Harris opened the door of the bunkhouse and nearly jumped out his boots when he saw the boy. "Hotdamnboy, you got whooped to a frazzle. He exclaimed. "The old man's hot enough ta fry an egg, so you lay low. I gotta head over to Whitefish and fetch his boys. Them others stay in town or are they headed back?" Billy winced as he dabbed at the bloodied lip, "Yeah, thanks to that idjit Greer. Sheriff arrested him." "I didn't see anyone else comin' back here," he shrugged bare shoulders. Figures, old man Steelgrave was angry now, seemed like that jasper was always mad at someone or about something. TAG: @Elias Steelgrave
  3. Wayfarer

    Planning: The Bear

    Certainly some sort of target shooting I imagine. Not sure if they ever did much knife throwing, except at people in dire necessity, XD.
  4. Wayfarer

    Matilda Devereau

    | CHILDHOOD 1851-1865 | Matilda is an orphan, all she knows about her early years was she was in an orphanage in Cincinnati run by an order of nuns of the Catholic Church. When she was old enough to be more aware, she did ask about her parents but was told she was found as an infant, maybe a few months old at best, on the steps of a church one morning. Nothing at all was known past that - either that or the nun had been lying. Her years in the orphanage were not grim ones, she was clothed, fed, and given a basic education so she could at least read, write, and do arithmetic. She was a well behaved child, she remembered being content enough. The nuns were strict but they did not mistreat the children. However at age 14, she did rebuff their efforts to get her to join their order. Matilda wanted to see that huge world out there and decide for herself what she wanted to be and do. | EARLY ADULTHOOD 1865-1870 | At age 15, she was allowed to leave the orphanage, the place was always crowded and they needed the space, she was deemed to be old enough then to hopefully find a decent life and happy future. She was given an extra set of clothing, a Catholic Bible, and off she went. The change was overwhelming to the girl once the reality set in. She was young, naive, and pretty and that's all she had going for her. Naturally people took advantage of her. She tried to find regular work without luck and fell in with the wrong sorts. Like so many other unfortunate girls, she seemed doomed to fall into the life of a prostitute by the time she was 17. Then she finally caught a lucky break. A saloon gal noticed how similar Matilda looked to her own now deceased younger sister and took pity on her, securing her a kitchen job in the place she worked. It was the girl's introduction to saloon life. Matilda left that job only once her mentor died of a sudden unknown illness as she suspected poisoning but had no proof. Now 19 she headed west with a vague sort of dream about maybe getting as far as California though she knew nothing about it. | LAST FIVE YEARS 1870-1875 | She got as far as Chicago when what little money she had ran out so she had to find some way to get some more. Going to one of the local saloons, she figured that was the sort of thing she knew best and asked about possible employment. Taylor Osgood, the owner, a dashing young man with the most impressive handlebar mustache and such manners too, took a shine to her from the very first. He gave her a job of sorts, calling her his personal assistant. She really had to do very little though but accompany him on his arm for socials and dinners. She wanted more though and pestered him for more responsibility in the saloon daily business. He reluctantly granted it - at first- until he saw how capable she was. He soon realized he could do even less and let her run things, an arrangement that pleased both. One day he stunned her by proposing marriage, a part of her felt that might well be a mistake, but she agreed. It proved to be a very unhappy coupling. She did give birth to a baby girl, he had hoped for a boy, but sadly the infant died only a couple months later. Matilda took it hard, Osgood seemed almost relieved for the babe had taken away Matilda from spending as much time running his saloon. The couple began to squabble about almost every little thing. It was during this time that Matilda hired on an experienced saloon man, Ralph Flandry, and, unlike her husband, he proved competent at this sort of thing and very helpful to her. His strengths were her weaknesses and besides he was a male in what was mostly a male world, the saloon trade. This time though Matilda had learned to stay away from any romantic developments, it was a business partnership instead. That seemed to be fine with Ralph too. A few years passed and Ralph was entrenched in his position, trusted and relied upon by Matilda and at least tolerated by Taylor who often neglected the day to day humdrum anyhow. Matilda and Ralph talked one night very seriously while they split a bottle of Irish whiskey. Matilda wanted to have her own saloon but such a concept was a bit overreaching as far as society was concerned. But if Ralph would go in with her, as co-owner, they could make it work. Ralph jumped at the idea. There remained one obstacle, Taylor Osgood. Matilda decided she would ask for a divorce and work out a private deal with Taylor to get a sizeable share of the money in the current saloon. Why not, she deserved it as she did all the work. Well, that did not turn out well at all, maybe the pair expected it would not. Osgood refused and their relationship was now poisoned beyond repair. Very soon after Osgood made his own move. He brought in a good friend of his, an off duty constable of the Chicago police known for his rough ways and attempted to throw Matilda out of the place, his life, everything. It descended into violence quickly, as usual Matilda fought back like the spitfire she was even against two larger men and the fight spilled out into the saloon's main room itself, scattering stunned customers. Ralph now intervened. Osgood drew a pistol and fired, narrowly missing Ralph who dove for cover. The constable drew his own weapon and blazed away. Ralph withstood the quick volley then calmly popped up and shot first the constable then Osgood. The off duty policeman died instantly, Osgood remained standing and still armed. But only for seconds as Matilda had reached the bar and pulled a revolver behind the shelf then aimed it right at her despised husband. Her shot took the man right in the chest and he collapsed. He would finally expire the next day in his own bed. This entire bloody confrontation had taken place with close to twenty customers and when the inevitable investigation opened up, even the police department could not avenge their now deceased officer as it was stated by the witnesses the dead men had drawn weapons and fired first. Ralph was never charged, Matilda was for some reason brought to an actual trial where a jury quickly found her not guilty. Matilda had her money now, all of it even. But staying in Chicago seemed a bad bet, Osgood had other friends, a few in high places and then there was the police who never took well to one of their own dying regardless of the reasons. No, it was time to go west and start over. Soon after their search turned up an available saloon in some backwater little Montana town, Kalispell. | The Present: 1875 | Negotiations were done by mail and it went quite smoothly. The saloon changed hands soon after and the old sign went down, replaced by a freshly painted one. The Stardust Saloon was now open for business!
  5. Wayfarer

    Ralph Flandry

    | CHILDHOOD 1836-1851 | Ralph was the middle child of three born into a farm family in upstate New York. His parents were God fearing and strict in bringing their children up but they were fair. It was a hard life and the father expected the boys to help him in the farm labors as soon as they were able. By age 12, Ralph knew he wanted to be anything but a dirt farmer. He ran away at 13 and 14 but was caught and returned to his family. He didn't hate his family, he hated the farm. Finally at age 15, he was given an opportunity to accompany a relative to New York City to work as the man's apprentice as his father surprisingly gave in to the inevitable. | EARLY ADULTHOOD 1851-1856 | Ralph found the city amazing with its size and endless places to explore, the huge numbers of people of all kinds who swarmed those streets and shops. As for the work, he soon tired of it for it was backbreaking labor and done with no real profit to him, he might as well have been a slave. He ran away, yet again but this time in NYC there would be no catching him. He then began a career of petty crime as he fell in with a street gang of young toughs. He found he liked a good fight and even better, he usually won. And for the first time he had some actual money in his pockets. | ADULTHOOD 1856-1865 | Being a criminal meant run ins with the law and eventually the inevitable happened, he got caught in commission of a crime and was sentenced to three years in prison. He came out unreformed but maybe a bit wiser about what he could get away with and what was taking too big a risk. He ended up taking a 'job' working for the local corrupt political machine which had him beating people up with legal blessings. He knew sometimes it was unfair and he didn't even like his bosses but it was money and that was the way life was in NYC. He was 25 years old when the Civil War exploded, tearing apart the nation. Though he would never have had to go serve, he decided he wanted the new adventure that being a soldier would present to him. He enlisted in a New York Zouave regiment, they got some really colorful fancy uniforms which impressed him. His regiment saw some bloody fighting and any glamour he imagined might occur in a war quickly disappeared. But while the conditions and harsh discipline was something he chafed at, he found he remained calm and poised during the fighting. He did his job and he even was noticed and promoted for his heroism. By 1864 he was a sergeant. Then his regiment was disbanded so he immediately signed up with another newly raised one, glad to welcome a veteran. He finished the war in that regiment and to this day proudly states that being in the war to save the Union and free the slaves was the best thing he ever did his whole life. | LAST DECADE: 1865 - 1875 | Demobilized one last time, Ralph didn't go back to NYC, working for the politicians didn't appeal any longer. He wandered about taking various manual labor jobs and never really taking to them either. He was restless and began to slowly make his way west to see what this frontier life might be all about. He took a job in Chicago at a saloon and found out he liked it! He was a bartender but the boss called upon him to often intervene with troublesome customers. That he did, with a zest. That's about when he met Matilda Devereau, though she was Mrs. Matilda Osgood back then. Her husband owned a prosperous saloon in Chicago also. She saw Ralph in action one evening and took up a conversation. He was impressed by her right off and then pleasantly surprised when she offered him a job at her husband's saloon with wages higher than he was currently making. He took it. Taylor Osgood was a fine businessman, well anyhow he looked the part with his nice wardrobe and handlebar mustache. But Ralph soon realized Matilda was the brains behind the operation. She did the day to day running of the saloon, while her husband spent freely of the profits. Even worse, he was a brute, he treated Matilda badly especially when he had a few too many. To her credit Matilda often fought back, she had gumption which Ralph liked in a person. A few years passed and Ralph was entrenched in his position, trusted and relied upon by Matilda and at least tolerated by Taylor who often neglected the day to day humdrum anyhow. Matilda and Ralph talked one night very seriously while they split a bottle of Irish whiskey. Matilda wanted to have her own saloon but such a concept was a bit overreaching as far as society was concerned. But if Ralph would go in with her, as co-owner, they could make it work. Ralph jumped at the idea. There remained one obstacle, Taylor Osgood. Matilda decided she would ask for a divorce and work out a private deal with Taylor to get a sizeable share of the money in the current saloon. Why not, she deserved it as she did all the work. Well, that did not turn out well at all, maybe the pair expected it would not. Osgood refused and their relationship was now poisoned beyond repair. Very soon after Osgood made his own move. He brought in a good friend of his, an off duty constable of the Chicago police known for his rough ways and attempted to throw Matilda out of the place, his life, everything. It descended into violence quickly, as usual Matilda fought back like the spitfire she was even against two larger men and the fight spilled out into the saloon's main room itself, scattering stunned customers. Ralph now intervened. Osgood drew a pistol and fired, narrowly missing Ralph who dove for cover. The constable drew his own weapon and blazed away. Ralph withstood the quick volley then calmly popped up and shot first the constable then Osgood. The off duty policeman died instantly, Osgood remained standing and still armed. But only for seconds as Matilda had reached the bar and pulled a revolver behind the shelf then aimed it right at her despised husband. Her shot took the man right in the chest and he collapsed. He would finally expire the next day in his own bed. This entire bloody confrontation had taken place with close to twenty customers and when the inevitable investigation opened up, even the police department could not avenge their now deceased officer as it was stated by the witnesses the dead men had drawn weapons and fired first. Ralph was never charged, Matilda was for some reason brought to an actual trial where a jury quickly found her not guilty. Matilda had her money now, all of it even. But staying in Chicago seemed a bad bet, Osgood had other friends, a few in high places and then there was the police who never took well to one of their own dying regardless of the reasons. No, it was time to go west and start over. Soon after their search turned up an available saloon in some backwater little Montana town, Kalispell. | The Present: 1875 | Negotiations were done by mail and it went quite smoothly. The saloon changed hands soon after and the old sign went down, replaced by a freshly painted one. The Stardust Saloon was now open for business!
  6. Wayfarer

    Earthquake!

    Nothing says welcome neighbor like an earthquake swallowing up ranches and folks.
  7. Wayfarer

    Earthquake!

    I am shocked you are not arguing for a volcanic eruption, XD.
  8. Wayfarer

    Leave of Absence

    Yeah, the flu has been bad all over this year. Take your time to recover, the game can wait.
  9. Wayfarer

    Planning: The Bear

    None of my people are horse or cattle people so none of them will be participating in any of that. Clara will probably enter a baking contest but only if she can have her entry back if she doesn't win, it seems like such an extravagant waste when the family's food supplies are so low. I had no idea they had foot races for men? Interesting.......... Robert is lean and young, long legs, good build for running, he could enter that. They should have potato sack races or can't think of what they called it but in school we had a guy and a girl who had their one leg tied together and then had to run in teamwork. It was hilarious. Wait think it was called three-legged race?
  10. Wayfarer

    Planning: The Bear

    Sounds like fun. I would volunteer the Redmond homestead to get a visit by our ursine friend (I actually love Bears XD). Helps set up the terror and I'm then thinking Aurelian would go along on the hunt.
  11. Wayfarer

    Clara Redmond

    | 1860 | Born to Kathleen and Aurelian Redmond in Scranton, Pennsylvania. | 1861-1865 | Basically brought up by her mother as her father was off in service during the war. A precocious child, fast learner, with seemingly endless curiosity. In late 1863 she got herself a little baby brother, Wyatt. | 1867-1872 | Her family lived on a farm where she had a happy enough childhood all the while learning about all that entailed being a woman on a farm. She was a big help to her mother. Kathleen used to remark Clara was a better cook than she was. Sadly there was another baby, Catherine, which was born in poor health and passed a few months later. They had to move also and their situation became increasingly harder. Finally her father decided they would move out west. Clara was excited, it sounded like a grand adventure. | 1873 | The train ride from the east out to Chicago was amazing to the girl, she usually kept her face at the window watching all the sights they went passed. For a time they stopped in Minnesota but her father said more and better land could be found further west. | 1874 | Finally her father pulled the trigger, as it were, taking up a homestead property for a very low price in Montana. This was to be their home from here on in. Work commenced on a cabin but they hadn’t been there long when Indians attacked them without warning. Clara was with her mother helping her wash laundry at the creek. It all happened so fast. The two ran for it at first sight of a grim looking warrior. Clara didn’t get far before she screamed in pain as an arrow sunk into her torso. Down she went. Her mother could have kept going but that was not going to happen. Kathleen saw the Indian raising his bow for another shot and the mother threw herself over the girl to shield her, taking the shaft right in her back. By the time Clara recovered consciousness, she was in the nearest town in a doctors office, her father and brother at her side. Aurelian had to tell her that her mother was gone. That probably hurt more than the wound, which was misery enough. For awhile it was touch and go when she developed infection but stubborn as always, Clara pulled thru. Their homestead had been burnt to the ground, everything left behind destroyed or stolen. Aurelian moved on as soon as Clara was cleared to travel. Finally he had a bit of good fortune. He met another homesteader who was leaving for the east as his wife didn’t like it out west. This man already had a property just outside the small town of Kalispell and there was also a cabin up too. Aurelian bought it and was determined to try again to make a home, a permanent home. Clara, who worshipped her father, was ready too. This time they would succeed if she had say so about it.
  12. Wayfarer

    Robert Cullen

    1856 Robert was born to tenant farmer Joseph Cullen and his wife, Agnes, their third child. 1858 The family uproots everything and risks starting all over in America, landing in New York. Encountering hostility to the Irish and lack of work opportunities, the desperate family moves from place to place. 1861 Becoming more aware of things by now, young Robert sees his father enlist in the Union army for some big war someplace. While it's not much, it's at least a wage. His mother does all sorts of menial jobs to help make due. 1864 Joseph returned home from the army minus a leg and in poor health. Oldest brother Liam started stealing to help the family much to his mother's sadness yet they needed what he brought them. 1868 Joseph died of drinking wood alcohol. Agnes took up with another man right after and Liam decided to leave. He offered to take Robert with him and their mother actually gave her blessing on it. The two boys struck out on their own, heading west for adventure or so they hoped. 1870 They made it as far as Chicago in their slow wanderings when Liam got into some trouble with the law and a judge sentenced him to jail for two years. Robert waited for him having to survive on his own. He did but barely. 1872 Liam was released a few months early due to overcrowding they said and the two young men were back together this time determined to get out of this city and go see the wide open frontier west they kept hearing so many stories about. 1873 The brothers traveled on a wagon train as far as the Dakota Territory, taken along by a traveling merchant to help with his two wagons of goods. Liam
  13. Wayfarer

    Aurelian Redmond

    | 1836 | Born in Scranton, Pennsylvania to Julius and Susan Redmond. It was a difficult birth, perhaps foretelling the often contentious relationship between parents and son. Aurelian was named after a famous Roman emperor, even as his father had been named after an illustrious historical Roman too. Julius was a successful businessman in town and always planned his son would follow him to take over the business someday. Once old enough to be aware of such things, young Aurelian had other ideas. There were probably many causes and blame to go around, but Aury was quite - first a scamp and then later a rebel. Julius was stern even severe and did not hesitate to use a riding crop on his defiant son. It didn't work. | 1851 | Aurelian had a serious run-in with the law, it seemed he was charged with stealing a horse which he adamantly denied to little avail. Even his father did nothing to help him as their relationship was already poisonous enough. Fortunately being 15 years of age probably saved him a harsh fate but he ended up serving three months in jail and owing the horse's original owner for the cost of the animal as it had been injured during the so-called theft and was put down. His father would not give him a penny. That's when his Uncle Ramsey stepped into the picture. He took in the lad and put him to work on his farm. Uncle Ramsey could be firm in his expectations too, but he also was much kinder in his outlook on bringing up a boy. Aurelian got along so much better with Ramsey, and his behavior settled down. | 1859 | Aurelian was working in a local racing stable in the horse barn when he met Kathleen Bevins at an event at the local race track. They danced into the night and hit it off splendidly. After a short courtship, they were married later in the year, Aurelian's parents were not even invited and probably wouldn't have come anyhow. | 1860 | Late that year the couple welcomed into the world their first child, a baby girl who they named Clara. | 1861 | The Civil War began and in a burst of patriotic enthusiasm a rash Aurelian volunteered for the service. He enlisted in a cavalry unit due to his experience with horses. He found himself a trooper in the 6th Volunteers Regiment or Rush's Lancers, the only unit in the war to carry lances. Later in the war, they were issued Sharp's carbines, much more practical. Aurelian participated in several skirmishes, his own opinion was the lance was useless but orders were orders. He was promoted to corporal in 1862 then to sergeant in 1863. | 1863 | A most memorable year for the young soldier and family man, during the Gettysburg campaign he was fortunate enough to be rewarded for his good service by a quick leave to visit his wife and little girl. It was but a single day (and night) before he had to head back to his unit, but nine months later Kathleen gave birth to a baby boy, Wyatt. Then soon after at the Battle of Brandy Station, Aurelian took part in what even many Confederate foes claimed was 'the most brilliant and glorious charge of the whole war,' his 6th Regiment suffering the single heaviest losses amongst cavalry in any single engagement of the war. Aurelian was both brave and lucky. He was nominated by his company commander for the Congressional Medal of Honor and survived two light wounds. | 1865 | By the time the war was over the 6th had been amalgamated with other units into the 2nd Provisional Regiment and was then mustered out late that year in Kentucky. His war was over, and he was heartily sick of it too. | 1867 | A rather subdued Aurelian now settled down to make a livelihood for his family of four. Uncle Ramsey passed away, just dropped dead out in his fields one hot summer day. He left the place to Aurelian, so the family moved in. | 1870 | Scranton had changed rapidly after the Civil War, growing into a full-size city and gobbling up the former farms on the outskirts. Aurelian was convinced to sell even Kathleen approved, they had been scraping by, but it had not been prosperous for the work put into it. | 1871 | For a time they lived with Kathleen's ailing mother as she could no longer manage alone. Aurelian had difficulty finding any decent work, it wasn't easy for the family, and it galled him fiercely. To top it off Kathleen gave birth to their third child, another girl named Catherine. Another mouth to feed however dearly loved. Sadly though the baby was never really healthy like their first two offspring and the poor little girl died a few months later. Kathleen especially was distraught. | 1872 | Late in the summer, Kathleen's mother passed on, and since the property was next to worthless with a small rundown house, they hung around long enough to sell it for what they could get then made the momentous decision to go out to the western frontier. The land was available out there, an ambitious man could take advantage of the Homestead Act and carve himself out a decent sized plot of land. | 1873 | The family utilized the railroads to take them west to Chicago then up into Minnesota where they stayed for a short time, but Aurelian had heard good things about Montana. It was a beautiful country there and more choice land available there than even Minnesota. So on they went further west. Seems no one told them about Indian trouble though. Not quite true, Clara, voracious reader that she was, had read of it in the papers when she could get a hold of one. Supposedly though there was a gold rush going on too and most were certain the government would have to protect the flood of prospectors swarming there. | 1874 | Montana was truly as scenic as they had been told. Clara sourly pointed out the winters would be hard, but Aurelian liked what he saw. Less civilization to him meant more freedom. Sure enough, they found a section of land they believed would be perfect, close to water, soil seemed rich and fertile. Aurelian put in a claim, paid his $18, and commenced to work on a place to live. That's when disaster struck. One early afternoon, they were hit by Indians. Later some told Aurelian they had been lucky it wasn't even a full war party but just a few young bucks looking for trouble and an easy target. Aurelian did not agree. It was all over in minutes really. Kathleen was washing some clothing at the nearby creek along with Clara. Wyatt was helping Aurelian with the roof. The Indians came at them from more than direction, and Aurelian no sooner spotted three braves coming at the unfinished cabin but heard screams from the creek. He and Wyatt scrambled down, a few shots missing them both until he reached for his rifle. He dropped one Indian, and the other two retreated. Then he raced for the creek, Wyatt in his wake trying to keep up. He found Kathleen first. She was dead, an arrow deeply embedded in her back. She was lying upon Clara who was moaning and also wounded. Another arrow had impacted just below her right collarbone, also a deep wound but not a fatal one. So far. Aurelian had no choice, he had to get help for his daughter, so he loaded up the wagon with her and his wife's body, hitched the team and headed for the nearby community. There was a doctor there and fortunately a good one. Clara lived. Once she could, Clara told of how her mother had shielded her with her own body after she had been hit by the first arrow. Aurelian knew that was his Kathleen alright. To add to his grief, later when he returned to his homestead, everything was either burnt to ashes or stolen, the Indians must have come back. Clara took a month to heal, battling an infection but stubbornly (for that was Clara) pulling thru. They left for someplace else in Montana then. | 1875 | Kalispell wasn't big, but it seemed nice enough. Plus Aurelian was a desperate man now, without his wife but with two children who depended on him, he had to find them a place to live. That is when he met Lloyd Sidwell and his wife. Sidwell was another homesteader, but he was in the act of leaving his place. He said his wife wanted to go back East but pointed out they already had a cabin constructed on their land. Aurelian paid him virtually the last of his money for that land. The man took him out there and indeed he had been telling the truth. It was actually a fine construction job too, better than he could have done, Aurelian grudgingly had to admit. He now had a roof over the heads of his family. It was enough for the time being. They couldn't give up, Kathleen wouldn't want that. It was time to make this place their home, no more moving. Come hell or high water, they were staying.

About Sagas

Sagas of the WIld West is a roleplaying game set in a fictionalized version of the town of Kalispell in Montana territory. Our stories begin in 1875 and are set against the backdrop of actual historical events.Sagas was inspired by the classic television and movie westerns. Our focus is on writing, storytelling and character development.

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