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  1. Today
  2. Well, at least Billy agreed with him. He had saved Clara's life (if Greer was as good a shot as he bragged) and probably his, too. Brendan gave the younger cowhand a short nod. Not quite an apology, but close enough to one for now. Greer seemed confident that sooner or later - sooner, it seemed he thought - they would wind up killing the Redmonds. He was just "getting a jump on it," which seemed like an awful thing to think. "Well, get a jump on it when I'm not down there too," he snapped. "I don't fancy bein' shot 'cause you decided to use me for bait." He edged his horse closer to Greer, getting in his personal space and looking down at him. "And I don't know what's good for me, I guess. But if Mr. Steelgrave thinks he c'n order me to shoot that gal down there, he's damn wrong. Now put that rifle away an' let's get out of here before her pa comes after us."
  3. "We know that there's four of you who don't want go to the dance but there are still twelve that do. Since we need another four to stay behind the only way to do this fairly is by lottery." Mike looked over at the hands gathered in the bunkhouse. The annual Spring Dance was a popular affair and most of the men were eager to go. He could see that they were all in agreement about whether or not they go would be a game of chance. He picked up the upturned hat that was on the table. "Inside this hat are twelve pieces of paper. Four of them will have a cross on it. If you get one of those you're staying behind." Ben raised his hand, "You part of this too?" "Yes, that includes me," Mike answered in a slightly sarcastic tone, "Afterwards if you want to negotiate with one another than that's up to you." As the men made their pick from the hat, the reactions to what they got ranged from joy to displeasure. Charlie, who even though still doing chores around the main house had already started his training, smiled as he looked at his piece of paper. He glanced over at Sam, who had obviously drawn one of the pieces with a cross on it. Seeing that Charlie was going, Sam got up but before he even reached his brother, Charlie put a hand up, "I'll save you the trouble. There's no way I'm giving this one away." Sam frowned before going over to Mike. "Well?" Mike smiled, "Sorry, it's a no from me as well." After a few minutes, Mike raised his voice, "All right, men. Now that we've got that sorted out, it's time for those of you on duty tonight to get out there. Don't want ole Sage thinking that we've gone and forgotten all about him. Remember, to keep an eye out for any suspicious activity." The men who had been assigned night duty, left the bunkhouse with a few of them trying to wrangle a deal that would let them go to the dance. Those left behind spent the remainder of the evening catching up on their mending or socialising with the others.
  4. "Checkers, then." Emeline nodded, a little surprised at how much she was looking forward to just a day of games, so reminiscent of Sunday afternoons growing up, when the family was all together. She had always enjoyed that time, and was looking forward to having it again. As he set up the board, she poured them coffee then set on a fresh pot to brew. Back at the table, she shooed Frankie off her chair, then sat and picked the cat up again. "I call red!" She gave him a serious look. "Lucky for you I'm not a gambler, or you'd lose your shirt to me!" @Flip
  5. For a moment, Addy let down her guard, accepting the comfort and support that Jay offered, and finding encouragement in his words. Finally pushing back, she smiled sadly and nodded. "Yeah, yeah, he'll stay here, a'course." She wasn't exactly sure what the law might have to say about that, but she'd fight tooth and nail for him. "Yer right, we'll wait." She shoved the paper into her pocket, nodding. "No sense ruining Christmas for him, an' that'll give me time ta talk ta some folks before I go to th' marshal...if I have other folks in town aggreein' ta help look after him when I'm gone." There was Dr. Danfort, Emeline over at the Lickskillet, Miz Mercer...the lad would be well seen after. "Ya can't tell no one we found out taday, since I really should talk ta th' marshal taday...an' I ain't gonna do that." @Jack
  6. Yesterday
  7. MacKenzie blinked in surprise at the woman's statement. He could feel the creeping heat climbing up from his collar and he also knew there wasn't a damn thing he could do about it. "Well, I would be honored if you would give me the privilege of a dance. Consider yourself asked right this minute, Miss Devereau." He returned her gaze steadily for several heartbeats then he coughed lightly and looked around. "Ahem...So...what else can I do for you, Madame?"
  8. "I'd like to see the finished product. That'll give me a better idea." “Why sure!” beamed Lorenzo “My thoughts exactly!” "I'll take 15 cents a piece for the first batch. Then 30% of whatever you sell. You provide the raw materials." His arms were crossed in front of his chest to signal that there was no room for negotiation. The bespectacled man laughed in a good-natured way and slapped Jay on one of his crossed arms. “Ha, ha! I like you Mr Ryker – you’ve got a sense of humor!” he exclaimed. He looked around the place, the lengthening shadows of the late afternoon were making it difficult to work at ease in the place, and yet it was still light enough to make the use of lamplight ineffective. “Say, are you ‘bout finished for the day here?” he asked “Why not come down the street to ours right now: we can have a nice little drink and discuss this 30% of yours.” He offered “An’ you can meet Charlie, he’s the brains of this mining equipment side of the business. And Bridget’ll be there too, she’d like to meet you, I’m sure. Oh, she’s a pretty young thing all right: handy, too - got her stitchin’ canvas under the riffles.”
  9. Neither MacIntosh nor Ke-Ni-Tay would skyline themselves in hostile territory, that went without saying. They had confront the plains Indians before and had no illusions about fighting them. They were different that the Apache in that way, but so was the landscape. Not firing the first shot was the policy that usually left one trooper dead, however, they were scouts, and if attacked, which would be highly likely in any event, the column would have advanced warning. He and Ke-Ni-Tay would be on their own, unless they could get back to the column. They had a long way to go, and a lot of hard country to travel in search of the Sioux encampment. If this band was out, then they too would have scouts and those were the ones MacIntosh and Ke-Ni-Tay would likely encounter, if not then perhaps locating the village would be easier. Whether or not Captain Barlow chose to arm their supposed guide, that was his decision to make, and other than one more man prepared to fight, it would make no difference to either of the forward scouts.
  10. "I'm counting on it!" In more ways than one! No snow freezing them out but keeping them in, and no Barnabas going home at night! "Funny, isn't it, that once the weather changes so you can easily leave, you won't have to!" Spring couldn't get here too quickly! “Ha, yeah, ain’t that a hoot? But, I slept on the floor before, an’ in many other spots I rather not repeat.” He agreed. “But, we got us a ways to go afore the melt. Much as we’d rather it happen tomorr’a.” He’d be glad when the winter was gone, but every season had a purpose. He might just get out and hunt, given the opportunity. "I do have cards, although I'm not well-versed on most games, and I do have checkers, and dominoes, too." How long had it been since she'd played card games. or any games for that matter? She headed to the bedroom, where she dug under the bed and pulled out a dusty box, waking the cat, who was curled on the blankets at the foot of the bed. "Lazy bones," she chuckled at the animal as she carried the box to the table, followed by the cat. "Here we are...cards, checkers...oh, and Nine Men's Morris...I'd forgotten about that! Do you want more coffee before we get started?" “Nine Men’s Morris, now there a trouble maker in more ‘n one bunkhouse. Never quite got the gist of it, but them others, now them I know how ta play.” He explained with a smile. “So, you pick.”
  11. Jay understood quickly that he was talking to a business man, who knew what he was doing. The advertising line seemed ironical but also pretty smart. "I'd like to see the finished product. That'll give me a better idea." Jay himself was also a business man. He wasn't short on money but he knew what one could ask for decent work. So he replied. "I'll take 15 cents a piece for the first batch. Then 30% of whatever you sell. You provide the raw materials." His arms were crossed in front of his chest to signal that there was no room for negotiation.
  12. Addy looked heartbroken and sad when she processed what it all meant for Weedy. She looked like she was about to cry, which made Jay want to hug her. She was usually so strong but she had a big heart and loved the boy. "I don't know. I'm surely no saint and don't know much. You shouldn't ask me." Of course that wasn't the answer she wanted to hear. In an instinct Jay stepped forward and hugged her tight. 'I think whatever you think or do is fine. You're such a great lady." For a monent he held her, then stepped back. "Let's have Christmas and in a few days we tell him together. Will you let him stay here?"
  13. "Outlaws are scum," was Clara's abrupt assessment on the girl's silly affectation for such men. However the child came from the south, what could one expect from such folk. “Hmph!” hmphed Arabella “I suppose you think Robin Hood and The Black Arrow are ‘Scum’ then, and Dick Turpentine!” She meant the folklaw hero-highwayman Dick Turpin. “Tom Love’s a gentleman, listen…” she fished out the latest newspaper clipping he had on the exploits of the man who had robbed the town’s bank last year from her apron pocket. She read the apposite part of the clipping out in her slow, methodical, frown-browed way: “… blah blah blah, Mr Love, in his letter, further explained that the man he shot in Kalispell last year had deserved it as he had been rude to a lady in the bank and begged one of the robbers to shoot her instead of him. Mr Love had then declared ‘For that ungentlemanly conduct, you shall die like the dog you are, you d___d coward’ and thereupon had plugged him one right between the eyes. Mr Love further el-lu-ci-date-ed” she pronounced the unfamiliar word syllable by syllable “… that the rougher element of his outlaw gang, a notorious and brutal killer identified by witnesses as ‘English Rodger’ had been expelled, as Love would not stand mere wanton murderers in his company.” Arabella looked at Clara triumphantly “And that’s in the newspaper, so it must be true!” she crowed. Then back to business about the dance, but Clara was being obstinate, and her reply to Arabella’s question about who the prim pie-maker was pie-eyed about at the moment just made the little Reb’s own eyes roll. "Besides I do not have my eye on anyone. All the boys....young men I know are louts and/or ruffians. I have better things to do with my life," she declared. “Ugghh!” Arabella grunted, waving her hand around the kitchen “What, like making pies for Ms Blakesly all day long?! That ain’t livin’ that’s just makin’ a livin’! Livin’ … why, that’s falling in love and having your heart broken and running all about the place and dancing and laughing and crying and kissing boys and praying and bein' mischievous and getting forgiven by Jesus and, oh, I don’t know … all things you can do goin’ to a dance and you can’t do sitting at home reading a book about Jonah Vark!” She took a deep breath after that little lot. “Besides” she added, mentioning the mysterious new friend whom Clara had yet to meet. “I can’t go with Bridget any more, we broke her leg practicing the Polka – so you see, you GOTTA come with me!”
  14. "We brought Mr. Crabbe out here because of what he knows so we'd be fools not to follow his advice...least for now. Sounds like we got a long ride ahead of us but so be it," Benjamin conceded. Lorenzo nodded sagely at the sound of his own name and mention of his self-proclaimed expertise in this matter. To be fair, he was not so much worried about not finding the gun runner, Calvin de Lancey, as what would happen when they did. "Alright, we head east then. Mr. MacIntosh, you and your man take the lead. For now it sounds like we are just trying to find the Two Kettles band." Crabbe grinned a little self-satisfied grin at the situation: on the one hand he was, to all intents and purposes, a prisoner; an unwilling hostage being taken into hostile Indian territory against his will. But to Eagle Woman’s people, or to Grandfather, would he be something else? Would they see his jailers more as an armed military escort, allowing him to travel where he needed to go without fear of molestation? Yep, every silver dollar had two sides to it, he reckoned, even the counterfeit ones. "Oh and I get nervous about ridgelines and high ground, make it a point to check those out lest there be hostiles waiting to spring an ambush on the opposite side," he requested. The Captain was directing these instructions to MacIntosh, of course: he would no more give instructions direct to Ke-Ni-Tay than he would to the scout’s horse. But the Apache was the one that interested Crabbe. MacIntosh was a good scout, with a good reputation, even fame in some quarters: he was more in the stamp of the resourceful Charley Reynolds, rather than that puffed up windbag ‘Buffalo Bill’ (whose shortcomings as an actual scout in the field were soon to be highlighted in the upcoming Little Bighorn campaign). But still, it was the impassive looking savage that Lorenzo would look to in any upcoming trouble. "And last but not least, we do not fire the first shot. See any trouble, get back fast. I want to be the one who makes the decision to engage or not." Lorenzo took his opportunity, seeing as the conversation had drifted that way, and casually asked “Say, Cap, don’t you think you should give me a shootin’ iron to tote, 'case trouble does break out? I ain’t the greatest shot in the world, but ‘every little helps’, as they say.”
  15. "Outlaws are scum," was Clara's abrupt assessment on the girl's silly affectation for such men. However the child came from the south, what could one expect from such folk. Needless to say, Arabella saw the upcoming dance quite differently and listening to her go on, the child was wildly optimistic on her chances with menfolk. But it did not change the older girl's mind in the slightest. "Yes, I do not want to go, I believe I stated that already," Clara asserted. "Oh Clara, Clara, Clara. Don’t you know that the only boys as ever asks a girl to a dance are the ones who you don’t want to ask you? The one you want never does. You just gotta be there and ready to bushwack the one you DO want. Now, who’ve you got your eye on right now?” Arabella asked, serious faced. "Bushwhack? I am not about to do any such thing," Clara rolled her eyes. "Besides I do not have my eye on anyone. All the boys....young men I know are louts and/or ruffians. I have better things to do with my life," she declared.
  16. The man was very pleased with the invitation, Matilda noted with satisfaction. "I can assure I have never felt that way about our gallant men in blue. Nor do I expect any trouble between the community and you soldier boys. We want this to be good time for all in attendance," she assured the man. "Who you choose in the end is of course your call, Colonel. I do not intend to tell you how to run your army any more than I would like being told how to run my business. And I think a dozen is quite fair number. Thank you for being so understanding," Matilda smiled graciously. "One of the advantages of being a widow is I can dance with whoever I please. I hope you might give it some consideration to ask me for a dance, colonel," she was nothing if not bold, it came with her business.
  17. "My God." Brendan's mouth dropped open. "You're crazy, Greer. She's a girl. You don't shoot girls!" "Why do you think I knocked his aim off ? We didn't come out here to shoot anyone let alone a girl," Billy was of the same opinion on this issue as Brendan. Greer suddenly felt like they were ganging up on him and he didn't like it. "Don't you all act holier than thou with me!" he snapped. He then added, "It's all just a matter of time anyhow. Mr. Steelgrave is gonna want their farm and he is gonna send some men out to wipe out that whole family and bury them so no one finds their graves. I was just getting a jump on it." "Dammit, Billy, you know how this is gonna end and lissen here Connelly, you better get used to it because if Mr. Steelgrave gives you an order, you better obey if you know what's good for ya."
  18. Crabbe explained what he believed would be the situation and it sounded reasonable enough. As for his guarantee, well that remained to be seen. But Benjamin would not be happy with a wild goose chase, not happy at all. The man then asked the scouts on their views. "You lead the way, we’ll scout ahead Captain, if there’s to be any trouble, we’ll sniff it out first. Times are not the most pleasant with the Indians, but, not all of them are out, yet. And Mister Crabbe, we’ll be sure to let you know if we see this “Granddaddy Longlegs” you’re goin’ on about," answered MacIntosh. "We brought Mr. Crabbe out here because of what he knows so we'd be fools not to follow his advice...least for now. Sounds like we got a long ride ahead of us but so be it," Benjamin conceded. "Alright, we head east then. Mr. MacIntosh, you and your man take the lead. For now it sounds like we are just trying to find the Two Kettles band." "Oh and I get nervous about ridgelines and high ground, make it a point to check those out lest there be hostiles waiting to spring an ambush on the opposite side," he requested. "And last but not least, we do not fire the first shot. See any trouble, get back fast. I want to be the one who makes the decision to engage or not."
  19. "I'm counting on it!" In more ways than one! No snow freezing them out but keeping them in, and no Barnabas going home at night! "Funny, isn't it, that once the weather changes so you can easily leave, you won't have to!" Spring couldn't get here too quickly! "I do have cards, although I'm not well-versed on most games, and I do have checkers, and dominoes, too." How long had it been since she'd played card games. or any games for that matter? She headed to the bedroom, where she dug under the bed and pulled out a dusty box, waking the cat, who was curled on the blankets at the foot of the bed. "Lazy bones," she chuckled at the animal as she carried the box to the table, followed by the cat. "Here we are...cards, checkers...oh, and Nine Men's Morris...I'd forgotten about that! Do you want more coffee before we get started?" @Flip
  20. Last week
  21. Mackenzie leaned back a bit, his hands sliding out to each side on his desk and a smile broke across his features. "Madame, I cannot tell you how happy your invitation makes me..." MacKenzie spread his arms to indicate the entirety of the fort surrounding them. "...usually in most of the commands I have been in, we are treated like a camp full of convicts or barbarians. Oh, when there are Indians raiding or bandits, what have you, we are very popular, but any other time it's "pay up front" or "stop loitering in our streets." MacKenzie then crossed his arms before him on his desk. "I totally understand your concerns and I would be unable to authorize leave for more than a handful of my men at any one time, so you and the town have nothing to worry about there." MacKenzie rubbed his chin with one hand as he looked thoughtful. "Let's see...I can leave the married officers to man the post. That would be simple enough, and I would like to invite some of our more senior NCO's...oh, apologies...my older sergeants, whom I believe I can trust to behave in polite company..." The colonel did some counting in his head then looked back at Matilda. "Would a dozen men be too large a party?"
  22. Mature Content: Language? Author: Put your OOC username here ONLY if posting with a Shared NPC. Location: The Evergreen Ranch House When: April, 1 1876 Time of Day: Mid-morning The big house seemed a mere shell of what it had been to Elias Steelgrave. His wife, Elinor, and run off and promptly disappeared. His best efforts to find her were rebuffed by a typically harsh winter with transportation at a near standstill. His suddenly rebellious daughter was in Kalispell, refusing to return to the ranch, and then barred from such action by the winter. Even his sons, Ben, Clay, and Zeke were rare visitors and where they had spent the winter was not known. And Case, he was on the mend in Kalispell from injuries suffered during the disaster which was the demise of Whitefish. Though it was possible to get through to the ranch and had been for a number of weeks, he had not done so. So, Elisa Steelgrave was alone. Alone for the first time in some forty years, and he didn’t like it. Oh he’d made some mistakes along the way, but none he didn’t believe he had or could repair. The incident wit Leah, well hadn’t he been drunk? It was not something he repeated, and he had regaled her with money, accounts in town, in Helena, wherever she wanted to go. Always first class. Still she refused to return. Seated across from him were his attorney Cole Latham and Nolan Ashworth, a man ensconced in the fabric of Kalispell and it’s citizenry. Neither had a pleasant look on their faces. “A rebuild of Whitefish is simply out of the question.” Latham said wearily. “There is no backing for such an undertaking. No backers are interested in funding it.” “And why not?” Elias demanded. “Interest is now to the south, in Kalispell.” Ashworth interjected in reply. “The hell you say! Why if it weren’t for Lost Lake Ranch and the Thornton-Cantrell bunch Kalispell would be a speck and Whitefish would be resurrected.” Elias stated. “And what’s the big deal with Kalispell?” “Perhaps you should see this.” Ashworth volunteered, holding out a copy of the Union. TBC
  23. "Like I said, we didn't think she was dangerous. I probably should have said she was a bit feisty." Billy still seemed unapologetic and unruffled, his grin not fading. A bit feisty? Brendan gave Billy an "older brother" look. The girl was as trigger-happy as Greer. Greer, who had been the one who shot at Clara. The one who was still holding the rifle and who seemed unrepentant about it. "Damn right I did! I was trying to save your life too. And I woulda if goddamn Billy here hadn't pushed me. I would have blown her head off, I woulda." "My God." Brendan's mouth dropped open. Clara was right to have held a gun on him if all the Evergreen hands thought like Greer. "You're crazy, Greer. She's a girl. You don't shoot girls!" Something in him - maybe it was the Southern chivalry his mother had tried to teach him - was horrified. Even though he'd been a cowhand for several years now and had seen and done many things that would shock his mother, he had never come across anyone who had tried to shoot a girl.
  24. "He was trying to get in for the past hour and now magically he got his wish. You carried him in," Clara pointed out. “Oh, Frankie, Frankie, Frankie!” cooed Arabella, cuddling the tom, who blinked his eyes in sure indication of relaxation. “I call him Frank, after my third favorite outlaw, Mr Frank Younger. The was another brown tabby one, Cole, but I think he’s been run over by a wagon cause I ain’t seen him lately. Anyway, Mr Cole Younger is my second favorite outlaw, but my favorite outlaw is Mr Tom Love, he’s the most romantical outlaw there is! And even though he’s a ‘Tom’ I ain’t named a pussy cat after him yet. Hey, ain’t it funny when you say a word a whole lot of times? Outlaw, outlaw, outlaw. Huh! Anyways, talking about romantical, how ‘bout this here dance?” “What we going to wear? Who d’ya wanna dance with? We need to plan it all out and practice dancing! I ain’t been to a dance in ages, my legs is all rusty!” "Glad to see you are all aflutter about the dance," Clara sighed, "As for me, I have no plans to attend. It is a foolish waste of time and I cannot be bothered with it." Arabella frowned at this display of non-logic by the usually cerebral Clara. “Sure it’s a waste of time, that’s why I wanna go! I wanna waste my time that way, being waltzed and polka’d and Schottisched about the dance floor by a whole succession o’ handsome men, an’ all the time Mr Wentworth standin’ there in the corner, in a jealous fury, an eventually he comes stompin’ across the dance floor an tears me from some handsome swain’s embrace and says ‘out the way sonny, this is MAN’S work!’, and sweeps me right off o’ my feet. An .. an … an you don’t wanna go?!!” she shook her head, uncomprehendingly. "Besides no boy has asked me. And I am certain no one will." Arabella looked at her supposed intellectual superior with sad, sad sympathy. “Oh Clara, Clara, Clara. Don’t you know that the only boys as ever asks a girl to a dance are the ones who you don’t want to ask you? The one you want never does. You just gotta be there and ready to bushwack the one you DO want. Now, who’ve you got your eye on right now?” she asked, serious faced. She needed this essential piece of information to start to plan the campaign on a grand strategic level. Individual battle tactics could be dealt with later, but in general, when dealing with romance, she followed the cast iron rule of General Nathan Bedford Forrest – ‘Git thar fustest with the most mostest.’
  25. Even though the girl was looking for, and one would think, expecting Clara's presence, she was startled when Clara spoke up. The cat she was trying to hold reacted in the same fashion. That was Emeline's cat too? “I come to talk to ya about the dance!” whispered Arabella excitedly “And Frank was trying to get in!” "He was trying to get in for the past hour and now magically he got his wish. You carried him in," Clara pointed out. “What we going to wear? Who d’ya wanna dance with? We need to plan it all out and practice dancing! I ain’t been to a dance in ages, my legs is all rusty!” "Glad to see you are all aflutter about the dance," Clara sighed, "As for me, I have no plans to attend. It is a foolish waste of time and I cannot be bothered with it." And then perhaps even unwittingly, she got to crux of the matter, "Besides no boy has asked me. And I am certain no one will."
  26. Permission granted, Matilda began her spiel. "Well, colonel, sadly it is not really as much for your men as for you and your officers. Kalispell is holding a spring dance, it's held in a barn just outside of town. There will be food and drinks of course in addition to music and dancing. I told the committee this would be a great opportunity to reach out to our gallant military and break the ice as it were. Get to mingle and know each other a bit. " "But there is no way we can take in a whole garrison of soldiery, your fine fellows would pack the barn simply by themselves. I hope you understand?"
  27. "Yeah, well, my hide is still in one piece, no thanks to y'all. What in hell were you thinkin', sendin' me down there?" Billy shrugged, "Like I said, we didn't think she was dangerous. I probably should have said she was a bit feisty." Their new hand turned his anger on Greer then, "And who shot that damn rifle? You could'a hit me instead of her!" "Who do you think shot it?" grinned Billy. Greer was not amused though, "Damn right I did! I was trying to save your life too. And I woulda if goddamn Billy here hadn't pushed me. I would have blown her head off, I woulda."
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About Sagas

Sagas of the WIld West is a roleplaying game set in a fictionalized version of the town of Kalispell in Montana territory. Our stories begin in 1875 and are set against the backdrop of actual historical events.Sagas was inspired by the classic television and movie westerns. Our focus is on writing, storytelling and character development.

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