Jump to content
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.

  • Recently Used Characters

  • Posts

    • "We'll have to get on over to the dinning room them. Afraid it's liable to be a bit more like Kalispell than Frisco." He said. "But it'll be good food, just not what we've been used too. Will be up on the hill, for sure.  I was told this is the best hotel because it was a ways out across the river from town, and it was solid built."   "The wealth on the hill is such that all most everything around it is growing at a fast pace. You'll really see that when we visit the Capitol, Carson City. Supposedly discovered by Kit Carson and General John Freemont on their way to Sacramento in. At least Freemont named the river after him back in '43 or '44. Nothin' was there then."   "All that made me hungry too, let's go eat an then take us a walk across the river, or along it, which ever you want." @Bongo
    • That did not take long. Cookie rang the triangle and shouted his best but in the end he sent the kid to roust all but the closest to him. Rance joined young Wheeler in the line, a bit out of the wind, but mostly in it for the moment. It seemed calmer up by the wagon.   "That had ta be bad back there. The wind drivin' the dust an' the smell, but should this wind let up you'll be on flank, left flank, then right, then back to the drag. It'll be me, Dallas, an' Dixie. eatin' dust tomorrow. But at least we got hot grub, won't always be that'a way out here though, every trip is different."   And they moved up steadily. @Bongo
    • "Nothing to discuss? I am surprised, Jonah. Why, if we have time for breakfast, there will be much to discuss regarding the hospital as well as the start of the orphanage. Hopefully that the railroad will be completed, or close to it by then." She smiled brightly. "Things will be different by then."   "My hope is that we get through all of this without my fathers interference causing delays, or real problems with the builders. You know we could get well into October before the snow flies, but I'm not counting on that. The winter will stop construction until the thaw." She stated, but the smile was still there, "But it will be well underway!" @Bongo
    • "Pleased ta meet ya, Rance."  Justus gave the man a nod, then lined up with the others for grub.  Maybe he could get some sleep despite the wind.  He surely was tired enough, and until there was something that concerned him, he didn't need to be concerned.   First, though, a full belly!  As the line progressed, he he nodded to the kid who was the cook's help.  "Times like this, I bet yer glad ya don't have ta be on th' downwind end of a herd'a cows!"   @Flip
    • "It's good to know you'll have the best working on the project, you've come this far, you don't need to risk the quality with less than the best working on it."  Even though he had no doubt that the crew would be excellent, it was reassuring to know that the man hand picked for the job would actually be on site overseeing it.  That way, too, he'd be there if Leah needed to discuss anything with him, and Jonah had a good feeling that was going to happen!   He grinned and took a sip of coffee.  "Just think, this time next year it will all be over!  We'll have a fine hospital with the best equipment...and nothing to discuss over breakfast!"   @Flip  

Thousands of Miles From Home


Aoife Leane
 Share

Recommended Posts

Mature Content: Doubtful

With: Aoife Leane and Robert Cullen
Location: Forest's edge, half-an-hour's walk from Kalispell
When: Mid-May 1876
Time of Day: About noon

 

content-divider.png

 

It had been some thirty minutes since she'd left the convoy. 'Just down that-a-way!' The trailblazer had said. 'Can't miss it!' Though here she was, alone in the wilderness, some thousands of miles from home, and still with no eyes on the town of Kalispell. Say what you would about Milford, but at least it didn't have giant predatory cats capable of turning a man inside out, or bands of natives who'd put a bullet in you just as often as invite you for supper.

Still, she was on her own now, this was the cost of independence, and there was nothing for it but to hope for the best. Milford might have had no giant predatory cats, but it seemed quite a dead-end compared to this frontier.

EFK17h1UcAImOrO.jpg.087aafa670bff3796e3711817c8faaca.jpg

Pausing beneath the trees, mid afternoon sun filtering through their leaves, Aoife set her trunk down on the forest floor. She'd have a rest, for a few minutes perhaps, before continuing. Despite it's dangerous aspect, the American wilds had a charm to them, and it was nice to be able to wander through nature without the threat of an Irish storm rolling through and sordidly ruining the ambiance. Folding her skirt beneath her, she sat down upon the leather top, procuring an apple from her pocket. The detritus around her seemed remarkably still, save for the occasional beetle or centipede that ambled it's way over the spring leaves, and she took a moment to regard the overlapping plants, the difference in turgidity of a fresh spring leaf and an old winter one, and the ever-so-slight tilt of saplings as wind whispered through them. I should come back here sometime. She thought to herself. Take some sketches, do some writing.

 

Instead, she bit into her apple, the crunch sounding quite loud after the forest's stillness. It was soft, and she made a face of distaste, but did not move to throw it away.

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Robert rested the rifle upon the fallen tree trunk, his eyes were focused on a doe not fifty yards from him, munching casually on whatever green stuff that was. Robert knew more about rocks than plant life. Outdoorsman he was not, hunter definitely not either. But he had bought this cheap rifle some months back so he could better provide himself with some meat to help eke out his solitary existence in these mountains. Granted he could buy food in town but that all cost money, money he seldom had much of. He almost didn't spend the precious few dollars he did on this gun but it was a deal too good to pass up. Unfortunately, there was a saying in this world...

 

     You only get what you pay for. 

 

Well, what he got with this piece of junk was lots of issues. He was quite certain the barrel might not be straight like it should be, the sight was off, and the missfire rate was high, way too high.  But it's not like he knew how to fix a firearm and those that did charged.........yep, money!

 

Still he had brought down a few animals though most of the times he missed. He reluctantly would have to admit part of the problem might not just be the gun but his own poor marksmanship. However seeing the size of his prospective victim and the proximity of it, he had confidence he could hit this shot. That would make for a lot of venison. Slowly he brought the weapon up to aim it and then..........

 

The damn deer suddenly burst from a dead stop into an amazingly fast skedaddle, practically flying thru the trees with amazing agility. Lowering the rifle, for he had zero chance to hit that fast a target, he sighed. Something had spooked it, he was sure that it hadn't noticed him though. He stood up and had little choice but to move on. Least it was a nice day and the weather pleasant. He had damn near died this past winter.

 

He didn't get too far when he spotted something....no, someone. Now word in town had been for some time that there was going to be a lot of Indian trouble in this territory and no white man was safe from those devils' predations. Still he had little choice but to take the risk given his livelihood as a prospector, panner for gold. This was no Indian though. This was a white woman!  And she certainly appeared to be alone too? Just sitting on a trunk and eating an apple. What was a well dressed woman doing out in the middle of nowhere with a big trunk? Well, he was damn well going to find out.

 

Approaching her in a steady amble, rifle now slung over one shoulder, the young Irishman called out as soon as he got to within easy range of a voice.

 

"Excuse me, miss!  You lost by any chance?"

 

As soon as she spun about, he halted and raised both hands, "I donna mean no harm. Don' worry."

 

ooc: I'm terrible at Irish accents in written dialogue - just use your imagination.  :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A rustle of branches as something bounded it's way through the shrub, all scrabbling hooves and wild eyes. Though serving to make her heart leap, Aoife quickly recognized the animal as a deer, probably having smelled her given that she was upwind, and allowed herself to relax. The solitude was making her jumpy. She watched the animal disappear between the trees, only the faint sound of crunching leaves to indicate that it had ever been there.

 

"Excuse me, miss!  You lost by any chance?"

 

Aoife paused mid-chew and turned her head quickly at the voice, the adrenaline of surprise surging through her again. This time though, the object of her anxiety was no forest creature, rather a dark haired, youngish sort of man, perhaps slightly more so than herself, with a weapon at his shoulder. What struck her more than his appearance though, was his accent, with the faint flat endings of an Irish heritage hidden in a harder American aspect.

 

"I donna mean no harm. Don' worry."

 

She swallowed her mouthful of apple slowly, regarding the man with a critical eye. "No, not lost." she reaffirmed, her own accent stressing the fricatives in her words. "Just pausing."

Given that the stranger was carrying a weapon, she could discern that he was likely out here by choice rather than happenstance. His clothing too denoted some sort of outdoorsman - someone used to the wilds, perhaps a hunter?

"Sorry I spooked your critter." she said, venturing forth on that assumption. "Are you from Kalispell, down the way?"

 

(ooc: honestly, never written an accent in my life so you're already a step ahead of me :P)

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The woman paused in her munching on an apple and then answered calmly enough, least she wasn't the sort to fly into a panic at the approach of a stranger. Some might.

 

"No, not lost." she reaffirmed, "Just pausing."

 

Robert had to wonder, was that an Irish accent? Sure seemed like it might be. But regardless, he just was looking for a simple exchange, a conversation is all now that he knew she was not in some sort of distress or danger.

 

"Ye don' say," he nodded, seemed liked an odd place to pause, in the middle of nowhere especially with that big trunk. She was too wee to be carrying that big thing around for a long haul.

 

"Sorry I spooked your critter." she said, venturing forth on that assumption. "Are you from Kalispell, down the way?"

 

"My critter?" he raised one eyebrow then realized her meaning, "Oh, the deer. Nah, they spook easy, they do."

 

"Kalispell......no. Well, I mean ....sure, I know where it be, I go there on occasion. But I don' live there."

 

He gestured with a sweep of his hand in almost a 180 degree arc, "I live out here."

 

He accompanied that declaration with a sort of goofy grin, "Wild n' free...we Irish, ye know."

 

He just had to know, he was dying of curiosity, "What's with da trunk, aye?"

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Kalispell... no. Well, I mean... sure, I know where it be, I go there on occasion. But I don' live there. I live out here. Wild n' free... we Irish, ye know."

"I see." Aoife said, nodding to his grin in a good-natured sort of way. He was indeed Irish then, it would seem that an ocean of water could not distance her homeland from herself, even if there was comfort in familiarity.

"What's with da trunk, aye?"

"Oh. The trunk." she repeated, quickly standing and righting her luggage. It occurred to her for a moment that she was rather vulnerable already, and to reveal to an armed man that all of her worldly possessions lay within that leather case was simply asking for trouble. Then again, he probably wouldn't have approached from her front with the rifle shouldered, if there was indeed an ulterior motive to this meeting. That given, she decided to proceed with a degree of... optimistic caution.

"Only a few bits and pieces. Personal stuff." she explained, hefting the trunk in question once more, and after some deliberation she added; "Is Kalispell much further?"

She didn't want to seem overanxious, but shooting the breeze with a stranger out in the forest was not exactly her foremost object, right at this moment.

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I see." 

 

A woman of few words or she was still a bit intimidated by him? Robert hoped not, he really was hardly the scary type although granted he was carrying a rifle but then only a fool went unarmed in Montana. Oh and it did seem she had no weapon. Course it could be hidden.

 

He asked about the trunk but his question was poorly worded and she rightly misunderstood.

 

"Only a few bits and pieces. Personal stuff." she explained, hefting the trunk in question once more.

 

Well, at least she could lift it, though for how long she could carry it was still unknown. He then tried to figure out a better way to word his real question but she had one of her own first.

 

"Is Kalispell much further?"

 

"Oh well....it be a wee few hours walk yet and that be at a lively pace too," he answered truthfully, he'd done the journey back and forth a few times but he now owned a mule.

 

"Sorry miss, but I meant to be sayin'....how come yer stuck out here all by yerself now with that heavy thing? You get dumped out here in the midst of nowhere?"

 

Oh jayzus, here he was interrogating the poor thing and he hadn't even given his name! Quickly remedied.

 

"I'm Robert by the way. Or Bob or Bobby or Irish. I be answerin' to 'em all if called," he flashed what he hoped was a charming smile.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Oh well... it be a wee few hours walk yet and that be at a lively pace too,"

Aoife felt her stomach turn. A few hours more and it could be approaching nightfall by the time she arrived; a daunting prospect to say the least.

"Sorry miss, but I meant to be sayin'... how come yer stuck out here all by yerself now with that heavy thing? You get dumped out here in the midst of nowhere?"

"I'm Robert by the way. Or Bob or Bobby or Irish. I be answerin' to 'em all if called."

"Aoife. Charmed." she replied courteously, crossing to where Robert stood. If his declaration about Kalispell's distance was to be believed, then it was probably a fair stroke of luck that she'd happened across the young woodsman after all.

"In truth, Robert, I was with a wagon train, up that way." she said, indicating the direction from which she'd come. "Feller said the town wasn't far, and, well, I haven't any transport of my own. I haven't been in America long, see, and heard there was work down this way."

She sighed. Ratting off her life story wasn't the sort of thing she practiced on a daily basis, but it seemed she'd been left with no choice. She would indeed have probably wound up lost out here, hiking around in the woods for hours yet.

@Wayfarer

Edited by boshmi (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He had introduced himself then, giving her choices for names, Robert was one of those which had lots of variations, all nice and short. He had no real preferences.

 

"Aoife. Charmed."

 

The way she said it, she was hardly charmed but no matter. Certainly was a definite Irish name alright. He smiled.

 

"Hullo, Aoife."

 

"In truth, Robert, I was with a wagon train, up that way." she said, indicating the direction from which she'd come. "Feller said the town wasn't far, and, well, I haven't any transport of my own. I haven't been in America long, see, and heard there was work down this way."

 

"Well then  you come a long ways in a short time then, miss. It took me months to get from da big city of New York out to here," he pointed out, "me brother and I set out together. It be just me now, he's dead and buried."

 

"I can get ye inta town, if you like. Give ye a ride even. But we gotta go back a ways that direction," he then pointed toward a mountain slope looming above the trees .

 

"Got me a shack there and a big old mule. When he's in the mood, he can carry the both of us," he further explained.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Well then  you come a long ways in a short time then, miss. It took me months to get from da big city of New York out to here. Me brother and I set out together. It be just me now, he's dead and buried."

"I'm sorry to hear that." Aoife replied, and not entirely disingenuously. Even a year out on the frontier had been harsh for her, no doubt death was common.

"I can get ye inta town, if you like. Give ye a ride even. But we gotta go back a ways that direction," he said, pointing toward a mountain slope looming above the trees.

"Got me a shack there and a big old mule. When he's in the mood, he can carry the both of us."

"Oh." Aoife said lamely. She was more surprised than anything at his willingness to help, and under different circumstances her suspicion might have crept back in, but Robert's story did seem genuine, and he himself affable enough. After a moment of thought she added; "Thank you."

She turned to the direction he had indicated, peering up at the leering rise of rock. She'd hate to admit it, but having someone with a weapon alongside her was a relief, even if he was a stranger for the most part. If she was going to adapt to this American way of life, she'd need to stop making mistakes like this.

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She commiserated with him about his brother's death, it was polite of her, and he nodded, "Thanks."

But it seemed a long time ago and they both had lives now to live in the present. And she wanted to get to town, something he could help her accomplish, that is if she trusted him. He was a total stranger so he would understand if she was reluctant. Turned out she was not.

 

"Very well then, Aoife, can I take yer trunk for ye? It's gonna be a bit of a hike to my place. Nothing fancy as you might well imagine, just a bit of thrown together shack. I'm not tryin' to be a settler ye see, I prospect for gold. Pan it in the streams, that sorta thing," he explained.

 

"And before ye ask, how's it bin workin' out fer me then? Well, look at me, I'm poor as a church mouse. All those stories back East about there bein' gold everywhere...they be just stories I'm afraid," he smiled, by now his optimism had long faded but he had nothing else to do for a living, him being uneducated and well...Irish. Irish were not always welcomed in communities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Very well then, Aoife, can I take yer trunk for ye? It's gonna be a bit of a hike to my place."

"I ah... that's alright. I'll manage." she reassured him, though her grip on it's handle tightened as she said so. Considering that all of her worldly belongings were encased within those four walls, it was probably better to keep it close for the time being.

 

Nothing fancy as you might well imagine, just a bit of thrown together shack. I'm not tryin' to be a settler ye see, I prospect for gold. Pan it in the streams, that sorta thing, and before ye ask, how's it bin workin' out fer me then? Well, look at me, I'm poor as a church mouse. All those stories back East about there bein' gold everywhere... they be just stories I'm afraid."

 

As they began to walk up the way in Robert's indicated direction, Aoife found herself mulling over what he had told her. This young man, living alone on the edges of society, probably had it rougher than she could imagine. Surely the New World had more to offer than this?

"Whereabouts are you from then, Robert?" she asked. Presumably he had been born somewhere in Ireland at least, else he wouldn't have held on to the accent so strongly.

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The lady did not wish to relinquish her hold on the bag, one would think it held gold or something? He had just tried being the gentleman but was not about to push the offer, "Suit yerself."

 

As they now began to hike thru the woods, Robert's hunting trip temporarily set aside, he explained about where they were going and his present situation in life. No point lying about it, she had a pair of eyes and would see the truth of it anyhow.

 

"Whereabouts are you from then, Robert?"

 

"Ah I was born in County Down, farm there. Me Da was a shite farmer and by that I mean he was no good at it. The drink got hold of 'im, ye see. We ended up tryin' ta start all over in America and a rough voyage it twas too though I was not much more'n a babe then."

 

"We landed in New York and well, stayed in an Irish neighborhood, we all spoke the tongue rather than the 'merican English. Me Da died...and me Ma, she married this other man. Well, me n' Liam we set off to had out west. I tol' ye he din' make it. Accident, kilt him straight off it did, a blessin' really," he still missed him though even if it didn't sound like it.

 

"What' bout you, Aoife? What part of the ol' country ye from?"

 

@boshmi

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The drunken father, a sentiment that Aoife knew all too well. Alcoholism, although quite the caricature, seemed an epidemic to the Irish - as was ever so often declared by those less welcoming of the American people. She had never really seen the appeal in truth, though of course a nip every now and then could be fun, but blacking yourself out and spending the next day emptying your stomach simply did not seem a good time.

 

"What' bout you, Aoife? What part of the ol' country ye from?"

"Ah... Milford, in Ulster." she said, as she stepped over a branch. "We left a few years back. Same story, new start. Can't say I've done too much living here, plenty more traveling."

She glanced over to the young man as they walked, a momentary expression of unease upon her face. "I've heard that folk around here can be... poorly disposed to our kind. Is that a reason you're out here?"

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Ahh, Milford, me brother worked there for a stretch. I never was there though," Robert remarked.

 

"Trust me, I know how hard it be to go all the way here from the east, you've done well just to get this far, especially if you've traveled by yerself," he was actually impressed. There were bound to be men who would see a young (and definitely pretty) lass as a target.

 

"I've heard that folk around here can be... poorly disposed to our kind. Is that a reason you're out here?"  she then inquired.

 

"The town is friendly enough though I did have me some trouble with the blacksmith's apprentice for a bit when I first arrived. We settled it with fists. I won," Robert grinned triumphantly.

 

"But thing is, Aoife, the reason I be out here is this is where the gold is. Well, is hopefully supposed to be. Damned if I've found much of it. Just a few grains here and there, but no strike so far," he pointed out.

 

"You should be quite safe in town. The law is fair. If ye be religious there is a Catholic mission outside of town too but to be honest I never have been there yet. Have to admit to bein' not all that devout," he shrugged.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"The town is friendly enough though I did have me some trouble with the blacksmith's apprentice for a bit when I first arrived. We settled it with fists. I won," claimed Robert, triumphantly. Aoife allowed his good humor to rub off on her, and shot back a quick smile.

"But thing is, Aoife, the reason I be out here is this is where the gold is. Well, is hopefully supposed to be. Damned if I've found much of it. Just a few grains here and there, but no strike so far."

 

"And that's what you've been doing then? Combing the hills and rivers for treasure, outplaying anyone who comes at you?" It sounded almost whimsical when she said it out loud, like a cross between Robinson Crusoe and Ali Baba from the Thousand and One Nights. Come to think of it, the American frontier was probably a breeding ground for folk heroes. Who could say that Robert might not be one of them?

 

"You should be quite safe in town. The law is fair. If ye be religious there is a Catholic mission outside of town too but to be honest I never have been there yet. Have to admit to bein' not all that devout."

"Oh aye?" she said idly. Admittedly, religion had not been at the forefront of her mind for some time either, but an old Conquistador or French mission could be interesting to see. Unless of course it was a dull, modern thing, of which she'd seen plenty back in the home country.

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"And that's what you've been doing then? Combing the hills and rivers for treasure, outplaying anyone who comes at you?" 

 

"Mostly 'cept for the outplayin' part. Not quite sure what that means? To be honest, I haven't had any real competition out here. Oh there is one mine shaft I found but it was already abandoned. Course they claim that the best place ta find gold is on Indian reservation land though the government is gonna move 'em off that," Robert replied.

 

"You think we Irish have it hard.....be an Indian," he shrugged, "Feel bad fer 'em but that said gotta be careful as the Indians have been raiding and killin' folks all over the territory or so I heard."

 

Though he tried not to show it, truth was he was more than a little nervous about being out here all by himself, he would be as easy target for Indians. But for the gal, she'd be in town and that would be a whole lot safer.

 

"What about you? You have somebody you know in Kalispell? Or fixin' ta stay?"

 

He knew employment for women could be a real issue. Wasn't a lot a woman could do but menial labor such as servants or laundress. Course there was saloon work and whoring. But Aoife definitely did not look like a girl who would lower herself to that level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Mostly 'cept for the outplayin' part. Not quite sure what that means?"

"Oh, sorry. Sort of like, beating. With both wits and fists, y'know?" she offered, feeling ashamed at becoming overly verbose once again. She almost added 'like Ali Baba' but stopped herself, not wanting to complicate the matter any further.

 

"To be honest, I haven't had any real competition out here. Oh there is one mine shaft I found but it was already abandoned. Course they claim that the best place ta find gold is on Indian reservation land though the government is gonna move 'em off that. You think we Irish have it hard... be an Indian... feel bad fer 'em but that said, gotta be careful as the Indians have been raiding and killin' folks all over the territory or so I heard."

 

"I saw a few of them." she told Robert matter-of-factly. "On the caravan headed west. The trailblazers said they like taking convoys, what with being filled by fresh folk with their livelihoods."

"What about you? You have somebody you know in Kalispell? Or fixin' ta stay?"

 

"Oh well I left my folks back in Missoula. I heard there was work down in Kalispell, what with a hospital opening up." she paused for a moment, before adding; "I was a nurse. In Milford."

It seemed impressive, even to her, but it felt as though all she'd been doing for the past decade was putting ice on bruised egos. Maybe out in Kalispell there'd be more opportunity for real work.

 

As they rose in altitude, climbing upward to Robert's refuge, Aoife began to feel a little more relaxed. The nature around them was pretty, and little squirrels scurried around the boughs of trees as they passed.

"How good are you with that iron then?" she asked, indicating the rifle at his shoulder. "Ever shot a rabbit?"

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once she explained the meaning of her turn of phrase, it became clear and Robert smiled, "Not sure about the outwit part."

 

He warned her about the Indians, just in case she was that new out to the western frontier, but she mentioned she was aware of the risks. He should have known, she certainly didn't look ignorant. He then decided to ask her business and or plans in Kalispell, the place she was so anxious to get to.

 

"Oh well I left my folks back in Missoula. I heard there was work down in Kalispell, what with a hospital opening up."  

 

"There is? Did not know that," it was indeed news to him, though certainly good news for the townsfolk.

 

She paused for a moment, before adding; "I was a nurse. In Milford." 

 

He was surprised but pleasantly so, "A nurse ye be, huh? Well, there's an interestin' job I bet. Me sis would faint at the sight of blood, she would never have become a nurse."

 

He figured she was a sharp one from the start, "Well, I wish ya best of luck then. I  know the town has itself a couple of doctors. One's old an' one ain't."   He unfortunately couldn't be more helpful than that, having never met either of them.

 

"We're almost there," he wanted her to know not that she seemed as nervous as earlier, she was no doubt warming to the situation and the realization he was no danger to her.

 

"How good are you with that iron then?" she suddenly changed topics, indicating the rifle at his shoulder. "Ever shot a rabbit?"

 

"No, not very good. I'm better if my target sits still and let's me get up nice n' close but I can't hit a movin' target to save me life," he smiled with a shrug.

 

"If the Indians come after me, I'm gonna have ta ask 'em to stand still so I can aim," he quipped.

 

"I did hit a rabbit the other day though, he was quite tasty too. Me lucky day, him not so much," he added.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"A nurse ye be, huh? Well, there's an interestin' job I bet. Me sis would faint at the sight of blood, she would never have become a nurse. Well, I wish ya best of luck then. I know the town has itself a couple of doctors. One's old an' one ain't."

"Well it isn't for the faint of heart, but I manage alright. I imagine you've seen your fair share of innards and gore, if you've been living off the land." she told him. "...and thank you. For the well-wishing."

 

She couldn't quite tell how much time had passed, but it was enough that Aoife could have imagined waking back to the caravan by now. Not that it'd still be there of course. At any rate, she at least had someone to direct her now. "We're almost there." he told her, and Aoife allowed the tension in her trunk-carrying arm to loosen a little.

 

"No, not very good. I'm better if my target sits still and let's me get up nice n' close but I can't hit a movin' target to save me life. If the Indians come after me, I'm gonna have ta ask 'em to stand still so I can aim. I did hit a rabbit the other day though, he was quite tasty too. Me lucky day, him not so much." he quipped.

"Why, that's impressive enough on it's own." she said encouragingly. "I've never shot anything. Heck, no Leane ever has. Not for lack of fighting though. Da sure knew how to punch a feller. I suppose it requires a bit less thinking."

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He did not exactly enjoy gutting and cleaning an animal but it was a necessity out here but decided to just shrug. Not a great topic of conversation with a young lady anyway. She then asked him about his marksmanship and he gave her an honest answer.

 

"Why, that's impressive enough on it's own." she said encouragingly. "I've never shot anything. Heck, no Leane ever has. Not for lack of fighting though. Da sure knew how to punch a feller. I suppose it requires a bit less thinking."

 

Robert wasn't sure he should bring up his own experience with fighting. But once more he opted for honesty.

 

"Oh, I don' know about that. You know they call boxin' a science in some places? I have done some prize fighting on occasion. Purely for money it was. I needed the money. So I have boxed some. You don wan' ta just rush in swingin'. You have to keep a clear head," he launched into a bit of explanation.

 

"If you can avoid bein' hit or takin' much punishment, you got a better chance of winnin' and besides no one likes to get hurt," he grinned.

 

And they now had reached his humble home. It was really like he said, a simple one room shack and an almost primitive looking  ramshackle fence big enough to hold a single mule who contentedly stared at their approach.

 

shack.jpg

 

mule.jpg

ooc: Not saddled of course.

 

Not thirty yards away was a meandering creek, he had already been up and down quite a few miles of that stream panning for gold with no real luck.  But at least it was a good source of fresh water.

 

"I suppose I should admit I ain't much of a carpenter and for even that I had some help to put 'er up," he confessed.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"If you can avoid bein' hit or takin' much punishment, you got a better chance of winnin' and besides no one likes to get hurt."

"I'll keep that in mind." Aoife said, though the odds of her getting into a fistfight were probably quite low. Probably.

 

She glanced around at the shack as they approached, intrigued by how one lived out in the wild. Not that she could imagine ever settling somewhere like this, but the mere fact that Robert did was proof it was possible. A seal brown mule watched her with docile eyes, and she approached the creature as though to pat it.

 

"I suppose I should admit I ain't much of a carpenter and for even that I had some help to put 'er up."

 

"Does the job, doesn't it?" Aoife said with a shrug, pausing in her advance on the mule. It's presence added a Don Quixote flair to the whole Crusoe/Ali Baba pastiche, though she could hardly imagine Robert jousting windmills.

She shifted ever closer to the creature, holding out a hand to let it sniff her before petting it on the neck.

"I reckon it's homely. It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see." she recited, though the quote would probably go over the young prospector's head.

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, if she wasn't impressed with his shack and he certainly did not expect her to be, she didn't insult him over it, kind of her.  But her interest seemed to be in the mule as she approached the animal in the corral. The mule showed no fear but no excitement either, more like it was studying this new human even as she was assessing it.

 

"I reckon it's homely. It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see."  she stated as she petted the creature who calmly accepted the gesture.

 

Robert misunderstood and smiled, "Now, now, Aoife, you shouldn't offend ol' Abraham there. He has feelins too ya know. Besides yer gonna be ridin' on top o' him when we go to town."

 

"I bought him from the prospector who helped me build my castle here, he was tired of it all and his health was fadin' or so he said so he sold me Abraham and his equipment fer a pittance and then walked off. I heard later he never got further than Kalispell where he died a few weeks later. One of them docs, the old one, said his heart gave out. He was a nice ol' sort."

 

"The prospector not the doc," he quickly clarified just in case that was confusing.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I bought him from the prospector who helped me build my castle here, he was tired of it all and his health was fadin' or so he said so he sold me Abraham and his equipment fer a pittance and then walked off. I heard later he never got further than Kalispell where he died a few weeks later. One of them docs, the old one, said his heart gave out. He was a nice ol' sort. The prospector not the doc."

"That's a shame." Aoife intoned, as she began to more boldly pat the mule. "Abraham's a wise-looking feller. I'm sure he'dve missed his master."

 

She finished by stroking his mane (which, really, could have used a brush), and now content, she rounded on Robert, standing straight. "Well, can I've a look inside?" she asked. This real-life storybook business intrigued her to no end, and she half expected to find seven little dwarfs sitting within - or something of similar intention.

@Wayfarer

Edited by boshmi (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooc: Sorry, missed this!

 

"That's a shame." Aoife intoned, as she began to more boldly pat the mule. "Abraham's a wise-looking feller. I'm sure he'dve missed his master." 

 

"It tis," Robert nodded and also agreed with the second part, "I suppose he does, I do try and treat him proper though myself. "

 

The lass then turned to Robert, standing straight. "Well, can I've a look inside?"

 

"The cabin?" he blinked, he had certainly not expected that.

 

"Well, first off ye need ta know, I wasn't  expectin' visitors. It's crowded in there and ....well, messy," he reluctantly agreed though and led her to what passed for a front door, somewhat misaligned, he felt that in the winter alright.

 

He opened the door and there was a smallish fireplace with an iron cooking pot hanging over what would be a fire but he had lit a fire thus far in the day, probably wouldn't either til he started cooking something. There was a lantern on top of a barrel top and a narrow cot with a heap of blankets upon it. Things were hanging off nails on the walls, including a couple pair of long underwear which he quickly reached for and tossed off behind the cot.

 

"Home, not much but home," he shrugged.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"The cabin?" Robert said, a look of surprise on his face.

Aoife nodded. "Aye, the cabin."

 

"Well, first off ye need ta know, I wasn't  expectin' visitors. It's crowded in there and ....well, messy." he began, but even as he did so he was crossing to the door and opening it. Aoife followed, stepping over idle sticks and turned-up dirt until she could peek inside the little domicile.

 

It was, as she had expected; rather a barebones interior, with a crockpot, lantern, cot, and various other bits and pieces of which Robert busied himself in tidying or hiding with equal measure.

 

"Home, not much but home."

 

"It's nice." Aoife simply said. It was nice, in a storybook sort of way, but she couldn't imagine living in it. Robert must have been a persistent man indeed, if he could endure winter after winter in such conditions, all in the name of striking it rich. "Have you ever... y'know... gotten hurt? Bad? Enough that you couldn't get into town?" she asked, seemingly numb to the grim nature of the question. Of course safety and health were at the forefront of her mind as a nurse, but to her, it was a question of practicality, rather than sensitivity. It conjured up the question, though; how did frontiersmen manage when they fell ill? Or broke something?

@Wayfarer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • JulieS locked this topic
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...